Home » Industry

Good Intentions = Bad Decisions

5 March 2010 No Comment

Good intentions suck.

Here’s why:

GOOD INTENTION = BAD DECISIONSGood intentions are typically well meaning, sound incredibly reasonable, and are therefore very persuasive.

However, because they are usually informed by ignorance, the thinking that they generate is often very flawed.

And, worse than that, the result of following through without pausing to consider the downsides leads to failure.

WOW! THERE ARE SO MANY AMAZING THINGS ABOUT THIS PRODUCT THAT WE MUST SHARE THEM ALL = COMPLICATED, FAILED COMMUNICATION

WE MUST REMOVE ANYTHING POLARIZING SO THAT NO ONE WILL BE OFFENDED = NO ONE WILL EVEN NOTICE MUCH LESS BE OFFENDED

WE SHOULD DO EXACTLY WHAT THE CLIENT TELLS US BECAUSE THAT WILL MAKE THEM HAPPY = THEY REALIZE THAT WE’RE ADDING NO VALUE AND SEEK A PARTNER WHO WILL

WE HAVE TO USE LOUD, HIGH-ENERGY MUSIC TO GET PEOPLE’S ATTENTION = ADDING TO THE ALREADY LOUD, HIGH-ENERGY NOISE OF A TYPICAL COMMERCIAL BREAK AND THEREFORE BLENDING IN FURTHER

IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT THAT WE HAVE A GOOD MEETING SO WE NEED TO SHARE IDEAS THAT WE KNOW THEY CAN BUY = WORK THAT IS CRAWLING BEFORE IT HAS EVEN HAD A CHANCE TO RUN

Be very, very suspicious of good intentions.

Seriously.

Because doing something with the best intentions is not the same as doing the best thing even with questionable intentions.

Cheers

Leave your response!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.